PLEDGE NOW
Booming Or Busting: Cities And Regions After The Recession

Who’s hot and who’s not among American cities and regions.  Who’s booming and why on this side of the Great Recession.

Houston's downtown skyline. (Flickr/D.L.)

Houston’s downtown skyline. (Flickr/D.L.)

In so many ways, our gradual national comeback from the Great Recession is unevenly spread.  One of those ways is geographic.  Some cities, towns, regions have bounced back like gangbusters.  Some have not.

If you’ve got a knowledge center, or an energy boom, or a cultural trump card, or some other secret sauce, you’ve got a big leg up.  If you don’t, you’ve got a challenging road.

Richard Florida has been tracking regional up and downs for decades.  Now he’s rolling out the post-bust map of the economic world.

This hour, On Point:  hot and not on the new map of the American economy.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s School of Management. Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities, and senior editor at The Atlantic. His new piece in the Atlantic is “The Boom Towns and Ghost Towns of the New Economy.”

Karl Dean, mayor of Nashville since 2007.

Closing Segment: Real Estate Check-In

Diana Olick, CNBC real estate correspondent, author of the Realty Check blog. (@diana_olick)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Atlantic (Richard Florida): The Boom Towns and Ghost Towns of the New Economy — “Five years after the crash, with the national economy just beginning to return to something resembling normalcy, we can begin to trace the outlines of America’s emerging economic map—and take inventory of the places that are thriving, those that are declining, and those that are trying, in novel ways, to come back.”

The Wall Street Journal: Hiring Spreads, but Only 14 Cities Top Prerecession Level — “Employers are hiring more readily across the U.S., though only 14 of the nation’s 100 biggest metropolitan areas have more jobs now than they did before the 2008-09 recession. Six of them are in Texas, according to researchers at the Brookings Institution, who recently analyzed local economic conditions through the end of 2012. All of the 14 appear to have benefited in some way from a stable employment base, anchored by either universities, government agencies or high-tech hubs, helping residents avoid the worst of the job losses suffered by other areas.”

 

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
RECENT
SHOWS
Jun 9, 2016

Newly-minted college graduates on the job hunt. We’ll look at who’s hiring, starting salaries, and strategies for landing that first job.

 
Jun 9, 2016

Europe, India and China, are taking on American tech giants over privacy, monopolies, and more. We’ll look at the global technology pushback against the U.S.A.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Jessica Valenti: ‘Objectification Is About Dehumanizing People’
Wednesday, Jun 8, 2016

“There is some power in laying claim to the word victim.” — Jessica Valenti on the Stanford sexual assault case, and the importance of language.

More »
Comment
 
Why The ‘Roots’ Remake Matters (And What Stays The Same)
Tuesday, Jun 7, 2016

The recent remake of “Roots” on the History Channel makes important changes, Morehouse College’s Stephane Dunn argues. But it also holds true to the original story.

More »
Comment
 
Former Trump Advisor Roger Stone: ‘Trump’s Going To Be The Next President’
Monday, Jun 6, 2016

Longtime political consultant Roger Stone apologizes for his “two martini tweets,” even as he predicts Donald Trump will be the next U.S. president.

More »
Comment