PLEDGE NOW
‘Crazy Rich Asians’

Kevin Kwan’s new novel out of Singapore sends up a new world of wealth exploding in the East.

Kevin Kwan, author of the novel "Crazy Rich Asians." (Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte/Random House)

Kevin Kwan, author of the novel “Crazy Rich Asians.” (Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte/Random House)

The most famous China-born member of the billionaire world today is probably Wendi Deng Murdoch, wife of Rupert Murdoch, headed for divorce.

But Asia is exploding with self-made billionaires of its own these days. A “great wall of cash” out of China and beyond, on a scale that staggers.

A $150 million wedding these days? Look to Asia, and all that glitters.

Singapore-born Kevin Kwan captures it all in his new novel, “Crazy Rich Asians.” The wall of money rising over the world.

Up next On Point: Kevin Kwan and “Crazy Rich Asians.”

— Tom Ashbrook

Guest

Kevin Kwan, author of the novel “Crazy Rich Asians.” He grew up in Singapore, a child of wealthy parents. (@crazyrichasians)

Book Excerpt

Read an additional excerpt at the publisher’s website.

From Tom’s Reading List

NPR: Children Of China’s Wealthy Learn Expensive Lessons — “In China, having too much money is a relatively new problem. But the rapidly growing country is second only to the U.S. in its number of billionaires, according to Forbes magazine. And now an enterprising company has set up a course for kids born into wealthy families, who are learning how to deal with the excesses of extraordinary wealth.”

Elle: Meet The New Asian Super-Rich — “When mainland China shifted to a more market-driven economy late in the twentieth century, wealth creation went from almost zero to supersonic in a matter of decades. People in industries from manufacturing to property development to retail suddenly got stupendously rich, and a new class of superrich emerged. A decade ago there were no Chinese billionaires on the annual Forbes list. In 2013, there are 122.”

The Atlantic: The Growing Disdain For China’s Super-Rich — “Fu’erdai literally translates to ‘rich second generation’ and are generally either guan’erdai, meaning ‘government official second generation;’ xing’erdai, meaning ‘super-star second generation;’ or hong’erdai, children whose families have strong roots in the Communist Party and can ‘eat from both plates.'”

Playlist

“Shuang Shuang Yan” by Deng Bai Ying

“Bye Bye” by Denise Ho

Tweets From During The Show

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
ONPOINT
TODAY
RECENT
SHOWS
Jun 9, 2016

Newly-minted college graduates on the job hunt. We’ll look at who’s hiring, starting salaries, and strategies for landing that first job.

 
Jun 9, 2016

Europe, India and China, are taking on American tech giants over privacy, monopolies, and more. We’ll look at the global technology pushback against the U.S.A.

On Point Blog
On Point Blog
Jessica Valenti: ‘Objectification Is About Dehumanizing People’
Wednesday, Jun 8, 2016

“There is some power in laying claim to the word victim.” — Jessica Valenti on the Stanford sexual assault case, and the importance of language.

More »
Comment
 
Why The ‘Roots’ Remake Matters (And What Stays The Same)
Tuesday, Jun 7, 2016

The recent remake of “Roots” on the History Channel makes important changes, Morehouse College’s Stephane Dunn argues. But it also holds true to the original story.

More »
Comment
 
Former Trump Advisor Roger Stone: ‘Trump’s Going To Be The Next President’
Monday, Jun 6, 2016

Longtime political consultant Roger Stone apologizes for his “two martini tweets,” even as he predicts Donald Trump will be the next U.S. president.

More »
Comment