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The Long View: The Global Economy

Globalization was the buzzword of the 1990’s. As the World Trade Organization was formed to reduce trade barriers and the internet and cheap flights facilitated international communication and travel, we really were living in a “global village.” In the wake of the September 11th attacks and the ongoing concerns about national security, there are signs that nations may turn inward and move away from the tenets of globalization that many believe led to the prosperity of the 1990’s: free trade, immigration, and international travel. Tonight, in Part 3 of our series on the “Long View,” we look at the global economy 10 years down the line. Could further globalization be a key to solving the current crisis the world faces? Or could it be one of the causes?

Guests:

John Edmunds, Associate Professor of Finance at Babson College and author of “The Wealthy World: The Growth and Implications of Global Prosperity”

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